#38 – The Tale of Stella the Starfish

Alisha Towers - Stella.png

Once upon a time, under an ocean no one had yet discovered, lived the most famous creature the underwater world had ever seen. Her name was Stella and she was a Starfish. Stella was so famous, that there were very few places underwater that you could visit where someone hadn’t heard her name. In fact, she was so well known that Stella had her own hammerhead sharks as bodyguards to protect her from the thousands of fish that followed her wherever she travelled.

Being famous was very hard work for Stella, as she had always felt as though she didn’t really want the fame and attention. It just kind of happened one day and now she felt obligated to keep her fans happy.

Stella first started becoming famous when she had ventured out to a nearby coral reef to find some food. On her way out, she bumped into a group of shrimp who were sitting by the edge of a coral reef, listening to loud music. The shrimp were always on the lookout for new and exciting dance moves, and, when they saw Stella float by, they immediately sat up and took notice. As the music played, the shrimp became hypnotized as they watched Stella just floating on by without moving or lifting a single muscle. They had seen many dance moves before, but nothing quite like this.

By the end of the day, the shrimps had told their friends about Stella and their friends had told their friends. So the next day when Stella floated on by, there were hundreds of sea creatures who had come to watch Stella’s new and exciting dance moves. The crowds cheered as Stella floated on by and, from that point on, Stella the Starfish only grew more and more popular.

After a month, crowds were gathering in their tens of thousands to watch what was now being called “The Float.” As time went by there were officially two types of creatures in the ocean: Those who knew how to do The Float and those who didn’t. If you did, then you could use that skill to get access to any number of underwater caves or shipwrecks. If you didn’t know how to do The Float, then you better know someone who did or else you might as well not even call yourself an underwater animal.

The crowds kept growing and, before long, Stella was starting to worry about being found out as a fake. She had a secret: she hadn’t really invented anything new and she was just doing what all starfish did. As time went on, her fame grew and soon she was being asked to give talks on what it meant to be an artist.  Her legion of fans was always seeking advice on how they, too, could be famous like her, but she never really knew what to say. Unfortunately, this was seen as proper star behaviour, which only seemed to make her more and more popular.

As the years went by, Stella started to feel tired of the constant drifting around and all the endless attention that had built up around her. But, concert after concert, she always managed to find the strength to give her fans what they wanted. So, it was just as much as a surprise to her, as it was to her manager and bodyguards when the crowds started to die down.

Each night, fewer and fewer sea creatures showed up for her performances. She no longer needed her bodyguards and her manager kept the bookings to smaller places such as giant clams or sunken surfboards. Then one night, her manager spoke up about what the problem might be. He had heard of a shark that could actually swim backwards and now everyone was interested in doing this new move called the “Sharky”.

Stella wasn’t upset by the news, in fact, she didn’t mind at all. She felt lucky to have had the experiences that came along with her fame. So, when her manager told her following a performance one night that this would be the final time that she would be performing The Float, she smiled at this news. She could finally go back to doing what starfish do and she floated off into the ocean.


My name is Gregg Savage and, every night when the house is quiet, I write and publish a free children’s story at dailytales.com.au for you to share and enjoy.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.


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