#223 – The Tale of Felix and the Jelly-Fish

Felix the Whale was lost. This was rather distressing because whales are not the smallest of creatures and swimming amongst a school of them one second and then realising that you couldn’t find them the next meant there was the potential that you could get lost on a very regular basis. Felix was too deep to be able to see the sunlight beaming through the waves and into the ocean, though he wasn’t deep enough that he could see the bottom, either. As he tried to remember what his teachers had taught him about what to do when you are lost in the ocean, he realised that there was more blue than he could handle and he started to panic.

Remain calm. That was the first thing he remembered his teachers suggesting to him. But, what did they say after that? It was difficult to remember. Felix struggled to remember his alphabet and the first twenty numbers even though he and his class repeated them each morning. Surprisingly, this was the least of Felix’s worries. His friends were patient, realising that Felix just needed more time to work things out than most other whales. The thing that bothered them the most was the fact that Felix was unable to sing. Singing formed an enormous part of being a whale, and often meant the difference between being included in the group or being left out. Felix’s friends made an effort to hide the fact that he could not sing and, so far, they had done a terrific job.

None of this stopped Felix from wanting to invent new and exciting things, however, and there were plenty of opportunities to put your creative mind to use in the ocean. Once, Felix’s friend, Peter, had started having to swim around in circles following a rather energetic fight with a shark over a piece of rotting food on the ocean floor. Felix decided that this was unacceptable and used some parts from a shipwreck to create a new fin that ended up making Peter one of the fastest whales in the ocean (other animals naturally requested the lifestyle device, however, being made from materials in an abandoned ship wreck meant that all of the materials were extremely rare).

So, here he was. Lost. Without anyone looking for him and no clear way of being found. He tried his hardest to sing but he could not even muster a groan. He was very eager to give up and swim out into the ocean to find new family and new friends when he turned and bumped into a jelly-fish. When his tail hit it’s wobbly body, it lit up, like a small neon ball. Felix then got an idea. He followed the jelly-fish, bumping into it every now and again just to make sure the jelly-fish’s lights were still working. Felix remembered a very important fact about jelly-fish: They travel in groups. After following his friend for some time, Felix became witness to one of the most beautiful sights he had ever seen. Hundreds of jelly-fish, lighting themselves up, sending out pulsating glow after pulsating glow, illuminating the deep blue ocean. Felix swam in the centre of them, spinning and flicking his tail, sending out a signal for help the best way he knew how.

Felix was having so much fun that he nearly didn’t notice his three friends emerging from the dark to save him. He might not have been able to sing, but Felix certainly knew how to drew attention to himself.

My name is Gregg Savage and, every night when the house is quiet, I write and publish a free children’s story at dailytales.com.au for you to share and enjoy.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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