#236 – The Tale of the Flying Ballerina

Once upon a time, there lived a ballerina named Allie who could only tell you what she was thinking and what she was feeling by dancing. If she was sad, her moves would be slow, but still graceful. If Allie was happy, her dances would have far more energy and her family would have to get out of her way as her legs carried her off the ground and her arms spun through the air like a helicopter taking off. Which is exactly what happened the day Allie’s two mothers, Tanya and Laura, came home with a brand new tutu.

The day Allie’s first tutu broke was a very sad day. Though it didn’t start out that way because Allie had woken up and instantly performed three spins to show her mothers just how happy she was. When she was asked how many slices of watermelon she wanted for breakfast, Allie performed three arabesques to give her answer. The family’s puppy, Milo, wanted to join in the fun as well and, much to his delight, encouraged Allie to chase him as she spun and twisted and turned around their house. This was when Allie tripped and fell, her tutu ripping on the tiles running down the hallway.

Minutes later, Allie got to her feet in the most dramatic manner possible. Her mothers tried to get her to relax and to see if they could bring her back to being her happy self again, but they had no luck. No amount of fruit or chocolate would stop her from bringing her arms above her head and over her body in slow motion one way, and then bringing them back the other way in an equally dramatic fashion. Worried, Tanya and Laura did what they thought was best; they hired a babysitter to look after Allie and they went to dress shop to purchase Allie a new tutu.

They arrived home to find that Allie was still making her way down the hallway using the same dramatic slow-motion movements she was using before they left. The babysitter thanked Tanya and Laura for the money and left. Tanya shook the paper bag containing Allie’s tutu, catching her attention. Allie threw her head down and lifted it up ever so slowly. By the time Allie was back in First Position, Tanya had taken the tutu out fo the bag and was holding it up in all its glory. Allie tiptoed over to her mother, took the tutu, went to her room and tried it on. After walking out of her bedroom in one long stride, Allie started spinning so fast and so out of control that she took off and was flying around the living room, her hands and arms knocking over vases and other precious items.

Unable to stop her from spinning, and again doing what she thought was right, Laura opened the front door, and Allie flew outside, spinning so fast now that, before they knew it, she was flying as high as the birds. Milo came outside and watched Allie spin through the air with his mouth as wide open as Tanya and Laura’s. Because Allie couldn’t control herself, she got close enough to one of the taller trees in their garden that her new tutu ripped against its branches.

Tanya and Laura and Milo looked at each other and sighed briefly before running over to catch Allie and prepare themselves for the drama of the rest of the evening.

My name is Gregg Savage and, every night when the house is quiet, I write and publish a free children’s story at dailytales.com.au for you to share and enjoy.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

One thought on “#236 – The Tale of the Flying Ballerina

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  1. This is both sad and adorable, I really enjoyed reading it. For some reason, though, I kept imagining Allie as a tiny plastic ballerina from a music box that spontaneously comes alive and grows in size. I don’t think it’s what you had in mind when writing this, but I find it quite funny and awesome how each person imagines something unique 😀

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